Mediterranean diet may reduce chance of frailty | 地中海飲食可能會減少虛弱的機會

News Release

Mediterranean diet may reduce chance of frailty according to new study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Frailty occurs in 10-15% of older adults, making it essential to develop strategies for prevention and treatment of frailty

Peer-Reviewed Publication

Hebrew SeniorLife Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research

A new study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that consuming a Mediterranean-style diet may prevent frailty. Defined as a recognizable state of increased vulnerability resulting from a decline in function across multiple physiological systems, frailty affects 10-15% older adults, and leads to other health issues. Although the general benefits of a Mediterranean-style diet are well known, its role in the reduction of frailty in older Americans who do not normally consume such a diet was unclear.

The study titled, “Adherence to the Mediterranean-style diet and high intake of total carotenoids reduces the odds of frailty over 11 years in older adults: Results from the Framingham Offspring Study,” showed that consuming a Mediterranean-style diet, may prevent the development of frailty with aging. The study included 2,384 non-frail adults from the Framingham Offspring Study with Mediterranean-style dietary pattern score and antioxidant intakes [vitamin C, E, and total carotenoids] estimated from a food frequency questionnaire combined with frailty assessments that were conducted over ~11 years. Each unit higher score on the Mediterranean Style Dietary Pattern Score (i.e., higher adherence to a Mediterranean-style diet) reduced the odds of frailty by 3%.

The study also determined whether specific antioxidants (carotenoids, vitamins E, and C) found in a Mediterranean-style diet are related with frailty. Higher intake of carotenoids (an antioxidant commonly found in brightly colored fruits and vegetables) had the strongest association with reduced likelihood of frailty development in middle-aged and older men and women from the Framingham Heart Study, reporting that each 10-mg higher total carotenoid intake reduced the odds of frailty by 16%. Vitamin E and C were not meaningfully associated with frailty prevention.

Courtney L Millar, Ph.D., Post-Doctoral Fellow, Marcus Institute of Aging Research, Hebrew SeniorLife, and Harvard Medical School, is the lead author. “People may be able to prevent frailty by following the principles of the Mediterranean-style diet,” Dr. Millar said.

The Mediterranean-style diet encourages consumptions of fruits and vegetables.

“Increasing the intake of brightly colored fruits and vegetables that are rich in carotenoids as well as other bioactive compounds may ultimately affect the health of older adults,” said Dr. Shivani Sahni, the senior author.

The Framingham Heart Study, Boston University, and Tufts University collaborated on this observational study. This study was funded by the National Institute on Aging’s support of the Boston Claude D. Pepper Center OAIC and the Peter and Barbara Sidel Fund.

Other authors included Elise Costa, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine; Paul F Jacques, D.Sc., Senior Scientist, Nutritional Epidemiology Team and Professor, Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University; Alyssa B Dufour, Ph.D., Assistant Scientist II at the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, Harvard Medical School; Douglas P Kiel, M.D., M.P.H., Director, Musculoskeletal Research Center and Senior Scientist, Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, Harvard Medical School; Marian T Hannan, D.Sc., M.P.H., Co-Director, Musculoskeletal Research Center and Senior Scientist, Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, Harvard Medical School; and Shivani Sahni, Ph.D., Director, Nutrition Program and Associate Scientist, Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, Harvard Medical School.

About Hebrew SeniorLife

Hebrew SeniorLife, an affiliate of Harvard Medical School, is a national senior services leader uniquely dedicated to rethinking, researching, and redefining the possibilities of aging. Hebrew SeniorLife cares for more than 3,000 seniors a day across six campuses throughout Greater Boston. Locations include: Hebrew Rehabilitation Center-Boston and Hebrew Rehabilitation Center-NewBridge in Dedham; NewBridge on the Charles, Dedham; Orchard Cove, Canton; Simon C. Fireman Community, Randolph; Center Communities of Brookline, Brookline; and Jack Satter House, Revere. Founded in 1903, Hebrew SeniorLife also conducts influential research into aging at the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, which has a portfolio of more than $63 million, making it the largest gerontological research facility in the U.S. in a clinical setting. It also trains more than 1,000 geriatric care providers each year. For more information about Hebrew SeniorLife, visit https://www.hebrewseniorlife.org or follow us on our blog, FacebookInstagram, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

About the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research
Scientists at the Marcus Institute seek to transform the human experience of aging by conducting research that will ensure a life of health, dignity, and productivity into advanced age. The Marcus Institute carries out rigorous studies that discover the mechanisms of age-related disease and disability; lead to the prevention, treatment, and cure of disease; advance the standard of care for older people; and inform public decision-making.


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