Does the Mediterranean diet really decrease your risk of dementia? | 地中海饮食真的能降低患痴呆症的风险吗?

中文版谷歌中文翻譯(90% 準確率) | English translation
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Editor’s note:  Many diets promoted by governments or some organizations may not be as healthy as claimed.   One major potentially harmful dietary factor is cooking oil.  Cooking oil ingested in high amount can cause a lot of health issues.  Remember this:  cooked oil contains a lot of trans fat which 99.99% people are not aware of.  Trans fat promotes all sorts of chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer and metabolic syndrome like diabetes.
编者注:政府或某些组织提倡的许多饮食可能并不像声称的那样健康。 一种主要的潜在有害饮食因素是食用油。 食用大量食用油会导致很多健康问题。 记住这一点:熟油中含有大量 99.99% 的人不知道的反式脂肪。 反式脂肪会促进各种慢性疾病,包括心血管疾病、癌症和糖尿病等代谢综合征。
News Release

Peer-Reviewed Publication

American Academy of Neurology

MINNEAPOLIS – A number of studies have suggested that eating a healthy diet may reduce a person’s risk of dementia, but a new study has found that two diets including the Mediterranean diet are not linked to a reduced risk of dementia. The study is published in the October 12, 2022, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The Mediterranean diet includes a high intake of vegetables, legumes, fruits, fish and healthy fats such as olive oil, and a low intake of  dairy products, meats and saturated fatty acids.

“Previous studies on the effects of diet on dementia risk have had mixed results,” said study author Isabelle Glans, MD, of Lund University in Sweden. “While our study does not rule out a possible association between diet and dementia, we did not find a link in our study, which had a long follow-up period, included younger participants than some other studies and did not require people to remember what foods they had eaten regularly years before.”

For the study, researchers identified 28,000 people from Sweden. Participants had an average age of 58 and did not have dementia at the start of the study. They were followed over a 20-year period. During the study, participants filled out a seven-day food diary, a detailed food frequency questionnaire and completed an interview. By the end of the study, 1,943 people, or 6.9%, were diagnosed with dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia.

Researchers examined how closely participants’ diets aligned with conventional dietary recommendations and the Mediterranean diet.

After adjusting for age, gender, and education, researchers did not find a link between following either a conventional diet or the Mediterranean diet and a reduced risk of dementia.

Glans noted that further research is needed to confirm the findings.

Nils Peters, MD, of the University of Basel in Switzerland, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study, said, “Diet on its own may not have a strong enough effect on memory and thinking, but is likely one factor among others that influence the course of cognitive function. Dietary strategies will still potentially be needed along with other measures to control risk factors.”

A limitation of the study was the risk of participants misreporting their own dietary and lifestyle habits.

The study was funded by the Swedish Research Council, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg foundation, the Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg foundation, at Lund University, the Swedish Alzheimer Foundation, the Swedish Brain Foundation, and other organizations.

Learn more about dementia at BrainandLife.org, home of the American Academy of Neurology’s free patient and caregiver magazine focused on the intersection of neurologic disease and brain health. Follow Brain & Life® on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

When posting to social media channels about this research, we encourage you to use the hashtags #Neurology and #AANscience.

The American Academy of Neurology is the world’s largest association of neurologists and neuroscience professionals, with over 38,000 members. The AAN is dedicated to promoting the highest quality patient-centered neurologic care. A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer’s disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, concussion, Parkinson’s disease and epilepsy.

For more information about the American Academy of Neurology, visit AAN.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn and YouTube.


Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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